Significant Thought – Conclusion “#SSVotes”

If you’ve read all of my posts on SilverSpringIncorporated.com, then I don’t need to tell you how significant your vote is again. Instead, let me tell you why I spent the last two weeks on this series.

I studied politics and government in high school, college and grad school. I moved to the DC metro area because almost all of the jobs I wanted were inside the Beltway. Politics combined the things I’m good at with the things I believed in. For me, this was a love of interacting with different types of people and my strong desire to make whatever part of the world I was able to a better place. After over ten years in politics, I have never regretted my decision. To me, public office is noble. I wish more people had it as a goal.

I couldn’t have predicted getting so involved in local politics. After interactions with elected officials of every type, and at every level of government, I realized quickly that away from a microphone or TV camera, 99% of them were in this profession for the same reasons I was.

An article in Esquire this month showed just how much Members of Congress themselves hate the gridlock. One Member said, “I didn’t get elected to Congress to not get things done—most people here want to get things done.” With rare exceptions, this is the type of person I run into in my field.

So public office, to me, is something noble. From my experience, those who seek it are almost entirely amazing people who are desperately seeking the right to be your partner in making a part of the world a little better.

I ask that today, on the first day of early voting, you look at the hours and effort candidates have put into earning your vote. Leave your cynicism at home and go vote.

 

Early voting runs today until October 30th, from 10am until 8pm every night.

You can vote at any of the locations in your county, regardless where you live. Here’s where you can find a list of those locations. If you wait until Election Day on November 4th, you can vote from 7am until 8pm. You can find where your polling place is here.

 

I’m not done talking about politics in and around my home, Silver Spring. I would love to hear about your voting experience, regardless if it was your first or 50th time, good or bad. In the meantime, thank you for listening.

My name is Abe and I’m asking for your vote. I’m asking you to vote.

 

 

Editor’s Note:

I just wanted to take a moment and thank you all for joining us through this series.  In early discussions Abe and I quickly realized just how severely disenfranchised people have become with voting and politics in general.  It was our feeling that we would have to implement an equally drastic messaging system in an attempt to break through the walls that we have all put up.

I want to thank Abe for all of his hard work and passion on this project. His pitch and original concept got through to me, a particularly cynical- disenfranchised citizen. I could see where Abe was coming from. Abe is a passionate individual: he’s passionate about politics, about being a father and about community.  He said it best in his conclusion:

“Politics combined the things I’m good at with the things I believed in. For me, this was a love of interacting with different types of people and my strong desire to make whatever part of the world I was able to a better place.”

What Abe is discussing here is community. Those values and reasoning’s are the same things I believe in. They’re the same things Silver Spring Inc believes in. I also believe they are the same things our readers believe in.  Cynical and disenfranchised are a horrible place for us believers to be.

Sincerely,

Nathan Fisher

 

We ask that you keep the lines of communication open.

We will continue the discussion here, but please reach out to us either through the comments or on social media. Abe and I will be organizing a voting group to go together to the polls.  Please join us and share your voting experience. We will both be on Twitter continuing the discussion.

Please use #SSVotes to share your thoughts and experiences.

 

 

Significant Thought the complete series:

Significant Thought – Part 1

Significant Thought – Part 2

Significant Thought – Part 3

Significant Thought – Part 4

Significant Thought – Part 5

Significant Thought – Part 6

Significant Thought – Part 7

Significant Thought – Part 8

Abe Saffer
I am a Congressional lobbyist for the American Occupational Therapy Association, focusing on issues dealing with education for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities. I've been active in politics and advocacy in Montgomery County, having served on the board of the Montgomery County Young Democrats, managed multiple local campaigns, and worked for Delegate Jeff Waldstreicher (D-18). In 2012 I received my Masters in Political Management with a concentration in political communication and campaigns from the Georges Washington University. I live in 20910 (Silver Spring) with my wife, Tonya. In my free time, I run the 2038 Congressional campaign for my son, Carson.

2 COMMENTS
  • Jonathan Bernstein
    Reply

    Abe, your points about the earnestness of Members of Congress reminded me of a memory of mine when I first came to Washington many years ago. I was an intern at one of the State offices in the Hall of States building and my job was to go to hearings and take notes. And skepticism about politicians has always run deep in our country, so “I don’t make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts” was one of Will Rogers great quotes. Anyway, I remember that my biggest surprise from the several legislative hearings I attended was how seriously all the elected Members of Congress seem to take their jobs as legislators. So please keep this civic engagement topic going!

  • Abe Saffer
    Reply

    Jonathan,

    I’m glad you enjoyed the series. I do plan to continue, but one other topics in politics and government. I want everyone involved, and so my hope is my articles take the glare off government and make that easier for people.

    Abe

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